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Dallas Cowboys RB Ezekiel Elliott had a moment after the cameras left his hostile press conference on Wednesday.

Ezekiel Elliott let guard down to Cowboys reporter after storming off

Ryan Wooden

Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott returns from suspension on Sunday against the Seattle Seahawks, but the drama surrounding his six-game absence for alleged domestic violence didn’t simply die when he returned to practice.

Elliott disconnected during his 42-day forced vacation and spent the vast majority of that time working out in Cabo. And it should come as no surprise that Cowboys beat reporters had a number of questions when he was first made available to them on Wednesday.

However, the exchange that took place left few satisfied. Elliott demanded not to be asked about the suspension and the reporters asked anyway, leading to a 7-question, 71-second interview that ended in Elliott storming off.

When the dust settled, people generally seemed to come down on the side of the journalists doing their job or on Elliott’s right to privacy with little room for discourse in between. But there was also a moment after the cameras were gone and things had died down where Elliott seemed to have a moment of understanding.

After he showered and returned to his locker, veteran Cowboys reporter Mike Fisher of 105.3 The Fan and CowboysHQ.com made a second approach and explained why he should probably answer at least a few non-prying questions.

“What’s your level of conditioning, your level of preparation, for Sunday? Is it normal? Are you ready to carry your usual load, to be the back you usually are?” Fisher asked.

“I am,” Elliott responded. “All of what you just asked. Yes. Yes. And that’s the absolute truth.”

Fisher does a very nice job at filling the space in the void between the no-good journalists and Elliott being a hot head and the entirety of his story on this exchange and the situation as a whole is undoubtedly worth your time.

But it all goes to show the value in a beat reporter who has actually established some trust between himself and his subjects.